Allergy

The Pharmacy Times® Allergy resource center provides clinical news and articles, information about upcoming conferences and meetings, updated clinical trial listings, and other resources.

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Future studies will help us determine who will most benefit from egg oral immunotherapy.
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The needed-free treatment option, ARS-1, is designed to be easy-to-use, convenient and more reliable than other emergency epinephrine treatments for severe allergic reactions.
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Teva’s Epinephrine Injection May Not Undercut Mylan’s on Price, but It Could Help in Addressing Shortages
 
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Nasal congestion can negatively affect quality of life by interfering with day-to-day activities and disrupting sleep patterns.
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A pair of pivotal Phase 3 placebo-controlled trials that evaluated dupilumab (Dupixent, Sanofi and Regeneron) for adults with inadequately-controlled chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps met all primary and secondary endpoints. 
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National Penicillin Allergy Day highlights negative impact of Inaccurate allergy diagnoses. 
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One lot of Montelukast Sodium Tablets is being voluntarily recalled by Camber Pharmaceuticals, due to a safety risk for consumers.
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The FDA has approved the first generic epinephrine auto-injector for the emergency treatment of allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis.
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Allergic rhinitis, also known as hay fever, is a common condition that causes symptoms such as congestion, nasopharyngeal itching, rhinorrhea, and sneezing.
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Between 10% and 20% of students in kindergarten through high school have chronic illness.
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Early life exposure to pet or pest allergens may reduce the likelihood of asthma development in young children, according to a recently-published study in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.1
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Pharmacists appear to have a better understanding of penicillin allergies than other health care professionals, according to study that included 276 surveys completed by non-allergist physicians, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists at Rochester Regional Health.