Surviving Nonfatal Opioid Overdose Linked to Higher Risk of Death Later

Adults who survive an opioid overdose are 24 times more likely to die during the year after the incident from a variety of mental health and medical conditions.

Compared with the general population, adults who survive an opioid overdose are 24 times more likely to die during the year after the incident from a variety of mental health and medical conditions, including from substance use—associated diseases and

suicide

, according to a study published in

JAMA Psychiatry

.

However, most died from other medical conditions, including chronic

respiratory

diseases, diseases of the circulatory system,

cancer

,

HIV

, and viral hepatitis; women were particularly affected.

The authors said an increased understanding of these risks “could inform efforts to provide preventive and potentially lifesaving medical care after the incident.”

Such care coordination is often lacking,

The American Journal of Managed Care® (AJMC®)

recently reported

,

due to a fragmented healthcare system and a lack of understanding among payers that providing such care can save them money.

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