Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin Shows Quality of Life Improvement in Patients With CIDP

Patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy who transitioned from intravenous immune globulin to subcutaneous immune globulin showed significantly improved quality-of-life measures.

Patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) who transitioned from intravenous immune globulin (IVIg) to subcutaneous immune globulin (SCIg) showed significantly improved quality-of-life measures without a loss in treatment efficacy, according to a study published in Muscle & Nerve.

The primary endpoint of the study was the percentage of patients who withdrew for any reason, including significant adverse effects (AEs). The secondary endpoint was symptom progression or relapse that necessitated a change in management.

The researchers assessed quality of life (QOL) and treatment satisfaction via the Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36), Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM), and Chronic Acquired Polyneuropathy Patient-Reported Index (CAP-PRI). Treatment efficacy was assessed via the Inflammatory Rasch-built Overall Disability Scale, hand-held dynamometry, limb motor strength testing (LMST), and timed 25-ft walk (T25-FW).

For the prospective, open-label study, the researchers followed a group of 15 patients with CIDP who switched from IVIg to SCIg over a 6-month period. Three of the 15 original patients withdrew—1 of whom did not gain benefit from treatment, 1 who was withdrawn by the study authors because of worsening neutropenia, and 1 who withdrew their consent.

Patients who remained showed significant improvements in CAP-PRI (P=0.02), TSQM (P=0.003), and in the “role limitations-physical” section of SF-36 (P=0.03). However, there no significant changes in disability or motor function other than for LMST, which favored SCIg (P=0.03).

Eight of the 12 subjects who completed the study chose to continue SCIg.