Study: Women With CAD, Heart Disease Often Go Undertreated

Pharmacy Times, July 2021, Volume 87, Issue 7

Women are significantly less likely than men to undergo coronary artery bypass grafting because of gender disparities in the understanding and treatment of coronary artery disease, research shows.

Women are significantly less likely than men to undergo coronary artery bypass grafting because of gender disparities in the understanding and treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD), new research results show.

Women with CAD frequently go undertreated, according to the study authors. Although there are many reasons for this, the authors pointed to a failure to recognize key differences in cardiovascular risk factors and symptoms in women.

For example, women are more likely to experience atypical, subtler symptoms of heart disease, such as abdominal and back pain, fatigue, indigestion, nausea, and vomiting.

Notably, some women do not even feel the obvious chest pain and pressure that are considered characteristics of CAD. Women also have their own set of risk factors, including higher levels of depression and stress, increased hypertension during menopause, and relatively high testosterone levels before menopause.

REFERENCE

Blaum C, Brunner F, Kroger F, Braetz J, et al. Modifiable lifestyle risk factors and C-reactive protein in patients with coronary artery disease: Implications for an anti-inflammatory treatment target population. Eur Jou Prev Cardio; February 2021. https://doi.org/10.1177/2047487319885458. Accessed May 17, 2021.