Sanofi Providing Access to Insulin for $99 a Month

The expansion of the Valyou Savings Program helps to address the challenge many patients face regarding unpredictable and unaffordable pricing for their insulin, according to the company.

Sanofi is expanding its Insulins Valyou Savings Program, starting in June. Through the program, people living with diabetes in the United States can pay $99 to access their Sanofi insulins with a valid prescription, for up to 10 boxes of pens and/or 10 mL vials per month.

Although Sanofi's combination insulin product is not included in the program, the expansion of the Valyou Savings Program helps to address the challenge many patients face regarding unpredictable and unaffordable pricing for their insulin, according to the company.

"It is unacceptable to Sanofi that some people living with diabetes are struggling to pay for their insulin, so we have moved to act creatively and aggressively to help address affordability and access needs," said Michelle Carnahan, Head of North America Primary Care at Sanofi, in a prepared statement. "By giving those who require both long-acting and/or mealtime insulins or use more than 1 box of pens or 1 vial per month access to their insulins for 1 flat price, we aim to help limit the burden on the individuals who have high out-of-pocket costs at the pharmacy counter."

People exposed to high out-of-pocket prices at the pharmacy counter can participate in the Insulins Valyou Savings Program regardless of income level. This includes those who are paying high retail prices for their insulin and those who don't qualify for other patient assistance programs.

Sanofi launched the Insulins Valyou Savings Program a year ago with the goal of enabling those who pay cash to pay the set prices of $99 for a single 10mL vial or $149 for a box of pens. Now, up to 10 boxes of pens and/or 10mL vials will cost $99 per month.

Since it was launched last April, the program has resulted in approximately $10 million in patient savings. The program is available at U.S. pharmacies.

"As premiums on insurance plans continue to climb, some people living with diabetes have had to exit the higher premiums so they can find ways to pay less. The result may be the loss of prescription benefits," said Lon Chenowith, who has been living with diabetes for more than 30 years. "That was what I was forced to do last year. Sanofi has savings programs for people who have been prescribed their insulin that can help them save on prescription costs. They have been a big encouragement to people like me."

Under current government regulations, pharmaceutical companies cannot offer this type of program to patients insured under Medicare, Medicaid, or similar federal or state programs. In a statement, officials with Sanofi said the company supports changing rules to expand this access program to all those who might benefit.

Kelly L. Close, co-founder, The diaTribe Foundation, and president, Close Concerns, said the United States' diabetes community is in the middle of a crisis, due to a dysfunctional health care system that doesn't allow equal, affordable, access to insulin.

"As patient advocates at diaTribe, we have been strongly urging manufacturers, insurers, healthcare providers, pharmacy benefit managers — and the government – to work together to help alleviate this problem," said Close, in a statement. "We recognize Sanofi for their outstanding leadership in order to make their insulins available at a better price for all, regardless of income or dosing needs."

Reference

Sanofi provides unprecedented access to its insulins for one set monthly price [news release]. Bridgewater, NJ; April 10, 2019: Sanofi website. http://www.news.sanofi.us/2019-04-10-Sanofi-provides-unprecedented-access-to-its-insulins-for-one-set-monthly-price. Accessed April 2019.