Predictors of Long-Term Survival and Health-Related Quality of Life in Multiple Myeloma

New research identified predictors of long-term survival and health-related quality of life in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma.

Research presented at the 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting identified predictors of long-term survival and health-related quality of life in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM).

The first abstract

used data from the registry, which is a multicenter prospective observational cohort study in the United States designed to examine diagnostic and treatment patterns, clinical outcomes, and quality of life in patients with newly diagnosed MM, in order to identify characteristics associated with overall survival of 6 years or greater versus death at less than 6 years.

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As of February 2017, the median follow-up was 65.4 months. Some of the baseline characteristics associated with overall survival of 6 years or greater were: age (being 70 years old or young); ECOG Performance Status of grade 0 or 1 (being fully active or being restricted in physically strenuous activity but ambulatory); lower International Staging System stage, which is used to prognosticate the severity of MM; and lack of history of diabetes.

The researchers also found that patients who had an overall survival of 6 years or longer also had higher rates of triplet treatment, stem cell transplant, and maintenance therapy (with or without stem cell transplant), as well as higher response rates.

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