OTC Pearl of the Day: Vitamin B5

Vitamin B5 can aalso be obtained from a healthy diet of broccoli, cabbage, white and sweet potatoes, whole-grain cereals, mushrooms, nuts, beans, peas, lentils, meats, and poultry.

OTC/Lifestyle Pearl of the Day: Vitamin B5 

Indication: Vitamin B5, also called pantothenic acid, is necessary for making blood cells and it helps you convert the food you eat into energy.

Insight:

  • Vitamin B5 can be obtained from a good diet of broccoli, cabbage, white and sweet potatoes, whole-grain cereals, mushrooms, nuts, beans, peas, lentils, meats, and poultry.
  • Daily allowance for vitamin B5 may vary by age and could range from 1.7 mg for infants 5 mg for adults, and 7 mg for pregnant and breast-feeding patients.
  • Symptoms of vitamin B5 deficiency include headache, fatigue, irritability, impaired muscle coordination, and gastrointestinal problems.
  • Vitamin B5, also called pantothenic acid, is one of 8 B vitamins.
  • All B vitamins are water-soluble, meaning that the body does not store them.
  • In addition to playing a role in the breakdown of fats and carbohydrates for energy, vitamin B5 is critical in the manufacturing of red blood cells, as well as sex- and stress-related hormones produced in the adrenal glands—small glands that sit atop the kidneys.
  • Vitamin B5 is also important in maintaining a healthy digestive tract and it helps the body use other vitamins, particularly B2 (also called riboflavin).
  • It is sometimes called the "anti-stress" vitamin, but there is no concrete evidence showing that it helps the body withstand stress.
  • Interactions: Vitamin B5 may interact with some antibiotics, such as tetracycline, as well as other medications for treating Alzheimer disease, such as donepezil, nemantin, galantamine, and rivastigmine.

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