Omega 3-Fatty Acids Could be Beneficial After Heart Attack

Omega 3-fatty acids allowed patients’ hearts to contract better and reduced fibrosis.

A recent study discovered that patients who took high doses of omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil for 6 months after a heart attack showed improved heart function and decreased scarring.

Post-heart attack remodeling can cause a patient’s heart shape and function to be altered, and can affect patient outcomes, according to a study published by Circulation. Currently, there are few effective treatments.

Previous studies have found that omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil improved survival among patients who had a heart attack. In the current study, called OMEGA-REMODEL, researchers assigned 360 patients to either take 4 grams of omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil or a placebo for 6 months.

Patients took the supplement, in addition to other medications. Researchers discovered that patients taking the supplement had a 5.8% reduction in left ventricular end-systolic volume index, and a 5.6% reduction in fibrosis in non-damaged heart muscle.

“Heart failure is still a major problem after a heart attack despite all the therapy we have and the advances in interventional care,” said senior author of the study Raymond Y. Kwong, MD, MPH. “Our findings show that omega-3 fatty acids are a safe and effective treatment in improving cardiac remodeling, so it may be promising in reducing the incidence of heart failure or death, which are still major healthcare burdens to patients who suffer a heart attack.”

The findings suggest that omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil let the heart contract better and can reduce fibrosis, according to the study. Additionally, researchers noted a reduction in biomarkers for inflammation, which suggests that the supplement is anti-inflammatory, as well.

The study concluded that using fish oil treatment could be a safe and effective way to prevent heart failure and improve patient outcomes after a heart attack.