Low-Dose Aspirin Use May Lower Risk of Ovarian, Liver Cancer

Low-dose aspirin users may have a lower risk of developing ovarian cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), according to 2 new studies published in JAMA Oncology.

Low-dose aspirin users may have a lower risk of developing ovarian cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), according to 2 new studies published in JAMA Oncology.

Previous studies have pointed to the potential protective benefits of aspirin use for certain diseases, with current recommendations that suggest its use to prevent heart disease and colorectal cancer. Research has suggested that the same benefits can be applied to ovarian and liver cancer.

In the ovarian cancer study, the researchers analyzed data from 2 cohorts: 93,644 women in the NHS and 111,834 in the NHS II. They evaluated timing, duration, frequency, and number of tablets used for standard-dose aspirin (325 mg), low-dose aspirin (100 mg or less), non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and acetaminophen.

Of the 205,498 women in both cohorts, 1054 developed ovarian cancer. The analysis found that daily low-dose aspirin use was associated with a 23% lower risk of ovarian cancer, whereas no association was identified for standard-dose aspirin use. Conversely, women who took non-aspirin NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen or naproxen, at least 10 tablets per week for several years, had an increased risk of developing the disease, according to the study.

“These findings appear to be consistent with case-control studies that show a reduced risk of ovarian cancer among regular users of low-dose aspirin,” the researchers concluded in the study. However, they noted that more research needs to be done before recommending daily aspirin use for this reason.

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