HIV Control Is Outpacing Diabetes Management in Women

Article

Among HIV-positive women with diabetes, HIV control has improved over time, but diabetes control has not.

Among HIV-positive women with diabetes, HIV control has improved over time, but diabetes control has not,

according to new study results

.

Through the widespread adoption of antiretroviral therapy, HIV has become a manageable chronic disease with a similar life expectancy to those without the disease. However, with longer life expectancies comes the comorbidities for this patient population. It is predicted that up to 84% of people with HIV will have at least 1 non-communicable, chronic disease by 2030, according to the study published in

Open Forum Infectious Diseases.

Notably, people living with HIV have are 1.6 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

“Although older age and obesity are associated with the development of diabetes, data show that people living with HIV are more likely to develop diabetes at younger ages and without obesity compared to the general population,” wrote the authors of the study. “The dual diagnosis of HIV and diabetes is troubling given their independent association with higher risk of cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of mortality in people living with HIV.”

Click to continue reading on The American Journal of Managed Care.

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