Gardasil 9 Could Prevent More Occurrences of Cervical Cancer

Gardasil 9 could decrease cancer risk and cancer-related death from HPV.

A recent study published by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests that switching to Gardasil 9 could decrease cervical cancer rates, as well as lower costs.

Gardasil 9 is a vaccine that protects against human papillomavirus (HPV), which is known to cause cervical cancer. This new vaccine provides protection against 9 types of HPV, including 5 cancer-causing types that were not included in older vaccines.

Researchers created a transmission model to predict the possible impact of switching to this newer vaccine. The model included 10 types of HPV, demographics, age, sexual behavior, and state-specific vaccine policy.

Researchers found that Gardasil 9 may lower cervical cancer rates by 73%. The older vaccines decreased cervical incidences by 63%.

It was also found that Gardasil 9 could reduce mortality by 49%. The older vaccines decreased mortality by 43%.

Though Gardasil 9 has a higher per-dose cost, researchers found increased cost effectiveness.

"Adopting the new vaccine is always cost-effective relative to the old vaccines," said study author David Durham, PhD, associate research scientist at the Center for Infectious Disease Modeling and Analysis (CIDMA) at Yale School of Public Health.

Researchers also state that expanding HPV vaccination in states with low coverage could prevent more cancers and death. As such, they encourage states to align their vaccination policies.

“The greatest benefits of HPV vaccination both in terms of cancer reduction and health care costs are realized when policy promoting vaccination is coordinated across states," said Alison Galvani, PhD, the Burnett and Stender Families Professor of Epidemiology and director of CIDMA.

Researchers also suggested an increase in state funding could improve vaccine coverage and public health, the study concluded.