FDA Approves Drug for Children's Nasal Symptoms Related to Allergic Rhinitis

A new FDA approval may soon help children with allergies seek relief from nasal symptoms.

A new FDA approval may soon help children with allergies seek relief from nasal symptoms.

Teva’s beclomethasone dipropionate (Qnasl) 40 mcg has been approved by the FDA for treating nasal symptoms associated with allergic rhinitis (AR) among children 4 to 11 years old, according to the manufacturer’s press release.

Qnasl 40 mcg offers a lower dose formulation than the already-available Qnasl Nasal Aerosol 80 mcg, which is a waterless intranasal corticosteroid spray for individuals 12 and older with nasal problems related to AR.

This approval makes Qnasl 40 mcg the only waterless hydrofluoroalkane nasal allergy treatment for children as young as 4 years old, according to Teva.

A study of Qnasl’s efficacy showed that once-daily treatment with 40 mcg of the drug provided greater nasal allergy symptom relief among children with seasonal AR and perennial AR when compared with placebo. Some common side effects were nosebleeds and ulcers.

“The approval of Qnasl for use in children aged 4 to 11 is an important advancement for an often difficult-to-treat patient group,” said Todd Mahr, MD, director of pediatric allergy and immunology at Gundersen Lutheran Medical Center in La Crosse, Wisconsin, in a press release. “Qnasl 40 mcg has several characteristics that provide prescribers with a treatment option specifically designed for children with allergic rhinitis, including its ‘waterless’ aerosol method of delivery and lower dose formulation.”

Teva estimates Qnasl 40 mcg will be available by prescription in February 2015.