Eicosapentaenoic Acid May be Beneficial for Diabetes Patients

Icosapeny ethyl reduced triglyceride levels for patients with diabetes, according to a session presented at the ADA 77th Annual Scientific Sessions.

Icosapeny ethyl reduced triglyceride levels for patients with diabetes, according to a session presented at the American Diabetes Association 77th Annual Scientific Sessions.

Data from 2 studies presented at the American Diabetes Association 77th Annual Scientific Sessions related to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) show promise in reducing triglycerides in patients with diabetes.

Investigators presented post-hoc findings from the 12-week ANCHOR study, which explored the safety and efficacy of icosapent ethyl (Vascepa). Included in the study were 146 women with persistent high triglycerides, despite well-established statin therapy. All patients had type 2 diabetes.

The authors stated that studying diabetes in women is particularly important, since this population has been historically underrepresented in clinical trials.

The investigators found that patients treated with icosapent ethyl had lower levels of triglycerides and other atherogenic lipids compared with patients treated with placebo, according to the study.

Icosapent ethyl also was observed to reduce inflammatory biomarkers and increase blood EPA levels, the investigators said.

Despite limitations in study design, the investigators feel these results demonstrate the potentially significant benefits associated with icosapent ethyl for patients with diabetes.

Icosapent ethyl is a single-molecule consisting of EPA in ethyl-ester form that is indicated as an adjunct to diet to reduce triglyceride levels in patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia. While the drug is not fish oil, it is derived from fish through a FDA-regulated process.

“Amarin continues to invest in research into the management of lipid disorders and patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease,” said researcher Eliot A. Brinton, MD. “The post-hoc analysis of ANCHOR study data explores the potential benefits and side effects of a therapy for women with diabetes that could help improve patient care.”

Amarin also presented findings from an in vitro study that suggests EPA may be an effective way to reduce dysfunction of blood vessels. The investigators found that EPA may have antioxidant-like properties that protect cellular function, despite disease, according to the presentation.