Compounding Pharmacists Awaiting Trial Under Home Confinement

December 22, 2014
Meghan Ross, Associate Editor

A pharmacist and a co-founder of the New England Compounding Center, which is in hot water for a deadly fungal meningitis outbreak that occurred in 2012, have been ordered to home confinement and GPS monitoring.

A pharmacist and a co-founder of the New England Compounding Center, which is in hot water for a deadly fungal meningitis outbreak that occurred in 2012, have been ordered to home confinement and GPS monitoring, according to The Associated Press (AP).

Barry Cadden, the co-founder, and Glenn Chin, the pharmacist, have pleaded not guilty to 25 counts of second-degree murder under federal racketeering law. Cadden was released on $500,000 bail, and Chin was released on $50,000 while they both await trail, the AP reported.

The 2 men’s lawyers argued that their clients were not a flight risk because they “have deep roots in Massachusetts and have long been aware of the likelihood of their arrest,” according to the AP.

The compounding pharmacy allegedly distributed tainted drugs, causing a fungal meningitis outbreak that led to 64 deaths.

Authorities told the AP that this will be the largest US criminal case ever related to contaminated medicine. Twelve other employees of the compounding center also face charges.

Among the many violations listed in the indictment are accusations that the pharmacy employees used expired ingredients while compounding drugs, created false documentation with made-up expiration dates, failed to properly sterilize drugs, and failed to comply with disinfecting practices. The indictment also listed 25 predicate acts of second-degree murder.