Bristol-Myers Squibb Announces Specialty Pharmacy Patient Management Programs For Sprycel (dasatinib) Patients

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company and Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc announced the launch of patient management programs for Sprycel (dasatinib) patients with a select group of specialty pharmacy providers.

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company and Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc announced the launch of patient management programs for Sprycel (dasatinib) patients with a select group of specialty pharmacy providers. The specialty pharmacies include Accredo, CuraScript, Diplomat, Biologics and Avella (formerly The Apothecary Shops). The distribution of Sprycel will remain open to other specialty and retail pharmacies.

These patient management programs are consistent with Bristol-Myers Squibb’s customer-centric strategy and will mark an important initiative within Bristol-Myers Squibb.

“Bristol-Myers Squibb is committed to supporting Sprycel patients and empowering them to take an active role in managing their health,” said John Tsai, vice president, United States Medical, Bristol-Myers Squibb. “We are excited to introduce these additional patient-centric programs that help support appropriate medication management.”

Specialty pharmacies are uniquely positioned to provide support services to patients for oral oncology medications. They also play an important role in the management of oncology patients through trained clinical staff who provide education and outreach that may help patients stay adherent to prescribed therapies. Bristol-Myers Squibb and Otsuka believe these services are critically important in oncology.

"Bristol-Myers Squibb is committed to providing support to cancer patients to help ensure they have access to the medications they need,” said Murdo Gordon, senior vice president, United States Oncology Division, Bristol-Myers Squibb. “Collaborative patient management programs with organizations such as specialty pharmacies are an extension of that commitment.”

Bristol-Myers Squibb’s agreements with specialty pharmacy providers are an important addition to its existing suite of patient support services such as My Sprycel (dasatinib) Support, which offers Sprycel patients a variety of tools designed to keep patients informed about their treatment with Sprycel and motivated to stay involved in their care, in close collaboration with their healthcare provider. To learn more about this program, please visit www.Sprycel.com or call 1-877-526-7334.

Sprycel is indicated for the treatment of adults with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (Ph+ CML) in chronic phase. The effectiveness of Sprycel is based on cytogenic and major molecular response rates. The trial is ongoing and further data will be required to determine long-term outcome.

Sprycel is associated with the following warnings and precautions: myelosuppression; bleeding-related events; fluid retention; QT prolongation; congestive heart failure, left ventricular dysfunction, and myocardial infarction; pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); and use in pregnancy.

About SPRYCEL

Sprycel was first approved for the treatment of adults with CML who are resistant or intolerant to prior therapy including imatinib in 2006 by the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA). At that time, Sprycel was also approved for adults with Ph+ ALL who are resistant or intolerant to prior therapy. Sprycel is now approved and marketed worldwide for these indications in over 60 countries including the European Union (EU), Japan and Canada.

Sprycel is also an FDA-approved treatment for adults with newly diagnosed chronic phase CML (since October 2010). Sprycel received accelerated FDA approval for this indication. The effectiveness of Sprycel is based on cytogenetic response and major molecular response rates. The first-line trial (known as DASISION) is ongoing and further data will be required to determine long-term outcome. Additional country approvals for this indication total over 50.

About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

CML is a slow-growing type of leukemia in which the body produces an uncontrolled number of abnormal white blood cells. According to the most recent statistics, about 26,300 people are living with the disease in the United States. It is estimated that 5,430 new cases will be diagnosed in 2012. CML occurs when pieces of two different chromosomes break off and attach to each other. The new chromosome is called the Philadelphia chromosome, which contains an abnormal gene called bcr-abl gene. This gene produces the BCR-ABL protein, that signals cells to make too many white blood cells. There is no known cause for the genetic change that causes CML

SOURCE: Business Wire