Athletes with ADHD Who Sustain Concussions at Higher Risk for Depression, Anxiety

A recent study found that athletes with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may need to be even more cautious in concussion prevention.

Athletes need to take measures to protect themselves from head injuries, and prevent concussions. A recent study found that athletes with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may need to be even more cautious in concussion prevention.

Athletes with ADHD may be at an increased risk of suffering from prolonged depression and anxiety after sustaining a concussion than those who do not have ADHD, according to a study presented at the American Academy of Neurology Sport’s Concussion Conference.

The researchers looked at ADHD diagnosis and history of concussion in 979 NCAA Division I student athletes from the University of South Carolina. The students were divided into 4 groups: athletes with ADHD who have had a concussion; athletes with ADHD who have not experienced a concussion; athletes without ADHD who have not had a concussion; and athletes without ADHD who have not had a concussion. Athletes answered questions measuring their mental health before the start of the sport season, according to the authors.

Athletes who had experienced concussions were evaluated at least 6 months after they sustained the concussion to determine how long the effects had lasted. The authors found that athletes with ADHD who had sustained concussions scored higher on tests for anxiety and depression than the other groups, and those symptoms lasted longer than expected.

For the full article, visit ContemporaryClinic.com.