Flu

The Pharmacy Times® Flu resource center provides information about early symptoms of the flu and the array of therapies in development intended to treat it as it progresses. Additionally, learn more about the data coming directly from the most widely attended pharmacy conferences and meetings, updated clinical trial listings, and other resources.

Beyond the Bench: Advancing Vaccine Education
What can we help you find?
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Is there any scientific evidence that sliced onions help rid a home of influenza and other viruses?
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A study showed that pharmacists in the state of Wisconsin are most likely to administer zoster and influenza vaccines to customers. 
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As people wait for the development of a vaccine for COVID-19, they may consider the need for other vaccinations as well.
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Pharmacists will likely encounter increased demand for the influenza vaccine during the 2020-2021 flu season because of the widely recognized value of this preventive health measure, and the anticipated continued circulation of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.
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The latest update from the CDC incorporates evidence that informs the duration of isolation and precautions recommended to prevent transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) to others while limiting unnecessary prolonged isolation and unnecessary use of laboratory testing resources.
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To combat influenza, widespread vaccination efforts by health care providers must be combined with a targeted and effective annual influenza vaccine.
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Seasonal influenza is usually active from October to May and is caused by A and B strains of the influenza virus.
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Prepping for flu season in 2020: why the vaccine is more important than ever.
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Many measures that were concomitantly being instituted across the country to curtail the spread of COVID-19 also decreased the spread of the influenza virus.
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The findings indicate that front-line health care workers are at high risk for COVID-19 and that many health care workers with the virus may not have typical symptoms of a respiratory infection, according to the study authors.
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The frequency of adverse events, such as headaches and nausea, was similar among those who received the drug (22.2%) and those who received placebos (20.5%) with no deaths in either group.
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Researchers conducted an online study with 371 participants who viewed a COVID-19 screening session between a hotline agent, chatbot or human, and a user with mild or severe symptoms, according to a press release.