After the completion of my bachelor’s degree in pharmacy and master’s in health care management, I knew I wanted to focus on patient education rather than delivering medications as a retail pharmacist. This was the driving force to pursue my doctoral degree, and to be later appointed as adjunct professor at the University of Phoenix.

After achieving this goal, I wanted to take medical education to a whole different level, adding a touch of creativity and passion to it.


One of Alsalih's pieces illustrates the influenza virus.

However, it was not until my father was diagnosed with colorectal cancer a few years ago, and later passed away in 2018, that I realized we live in a world that emphasizes self-care management. There is considerable interest in patients wanting to obtain health information online, educating themselves rather than relying solely on health providers.
 
Yet despite the myriad resources available today, they are still difficult to understand for an average patient or caregiver, especially those with a limited educational background. This confusion can significantly affect the recovery process for individuals who are confronted with their own personal illness or that of their loved ones.

I also realized that the perception of creativity has been limited merely to art and innovation, neglecting one of the main sectors that strives for this: education.


Another piece illustrates hydroxychloroquine and how it could impact the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

This was the motivating power to establish my Instagram page @brainstein_academy. There, I create simple and colorful medical infographics, utilize my love for art and my medical background to help patients and caregivers grasp complex health concepts, and motivate them to maintain a better quality of life.

As a result, I was recognized by being awarded the University of Phoenix honored faculty member award in 2015. It only takes a deep purpose and a unifying force to make a difference in our communities, and only a dedicated educator will truly help form the next generation of bright leaders. 


This illustration shows an artistic representation of drug overdose.