The prevalence and incidence of diabetes are substantially higher in First Nations people in Canada compared with those who live in Ontario, according to The American Journal of Managed Care. A research team found a greater prevalence of diabetes in First Nations women aged 20 to 43 years compared with women of the same age group who lived in Ontario. The authors warn that higher prevalence of the disease in women of reproductive age could lead to potential generational impacts on metabolic health.

A new phase 1 trial has demonstrated that a PRIMVAC placental malaria vaccine candidate is safe, immunogenic, and induced functional antibodies in volunteers, according to Contagion Live. The study, which marked the first in-human trial of the vaccine candidate, involved a randomized, double-blind trial in 2 staggered phase taking place between April 2016 and July 2017. Antibody titers increased with each successive dose and seroconversion was observed in all women who received the vaccination.

An ophthalmic condition linked to blindness in diabetes could serve as an additional indicator of increased stroke risk, according to HCP Live. An analysis of more than 2500 patients revealed that those who had diabetic retinopathy had an increased risk of stroke compared with patients without diabetes. The study also showed that having diabetic retinopathy was associated with a 60% higher risk of stroke compared with patients with diabetes without the ophthalmic condition. The study authors feel that more aggressive treatment for patients with a risk of stroke and who have been diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy may be warranted to reduce risk.

 

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