Adderall Abused for Academic Achievement

MAY 31, 2016
I’ve never taken Adderall, but I know others who’ve taken it for the sole purpose of performing better in pharmacy school.
 
I’m not referring to those who actually have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and are prescribed Adderall in order to focus. Adderall allows those diagnosed with ADHD to be on the same level academically as those who don’t have the disorder. The problem is that students who don’t have ADHD are abusing the stimulant at alarming rates.

Adderall contains a combination of amphetamine and dextroamphetamine thought to block the reuptake of dopamine and norepinephrine in the presynaptic neuron. That mechanism of action increases the release of those monoamines, which then enter into the extra neuronal space and stimulate alertness and productivity.
 
Study results have shown that, over time, those who use Adderall frequently develop a tolerance to the drug and are no longer able to function routinely without it. In 2010, Adderall was the most abused prescription drug in America. In recent years, abuse of Adderall and its imitators has amplified almost 200%. 
 
Many students abuse Adderall on a daily basis, while others abuse it only when heavily weighted exams arrive. Regardless, they all have the same intentions: to give themselves a greater advantage academically.

Although Adderall may seem beneficial to abusers as their grades improve, they tend to experience very negative side effects. Short-term adverse effects may include headaches, sleep difficulties, irritability, suppressed appetite, extreme weight loss, rapid mood swings, dehydration, nervousness, and changes in sex drive. Some Adderall abuses report forgetting to eat because they’re so focused.
 
Long-term adverse effects consist of both physical and psychological dependence, paranoia, depression, and hostility. In severe cases, Adderall can even lead to overdose and death.
 
Despite all of these negative outcomes, a large percentage of students continue to overlook these effects, continuing their drug abuse for the purpose of academic achievement.

If your classes are challenging, try to use better time management to devote more time to studying. If pharmacy is truly your passion, then get motivated and study with what you have. Completing pharmacy school without abusing drugs is something to be proud of.


Shelby Leheny, Pharm D, B.S
Shelby Leheny, Pharm D, B.S
Shelby Leheny received her Doctor of Pharmacy Degree from Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (LECOM) and her Bachelor's of Science degree at the University of Pittsburgh. She is a pharmacist at CVS.
SHARE THIS
0