Trending News: Social Media Use, Low Trust in Medical Experts Associated with Vaccine Misinformation

Top news from across the health care landscape.

The associations between migraine and several gastrointestinal (GI) disorders prompted investigators to examine the bidirectional relationship between the GI system and central nervous system, according to The American Journal of Managed Care. One randomized, double-blind controlled trial included in the study’s review found that probiotic administration resulted in significant improvements in the frequency and severity of the migraine and decreased use of abortive medications. Although specific mechanisms underlying the relationship is unclear, the researchers hypothesize that dietary approaches can have beneficial effects on the gut-brain axis and microbiota, which could lead to improvements in migraine symptoms.

Research from the University of Florida College of Medicine has revealed that certain characteristics in a patient’s gut microbiota could serve as a biomarker for pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH), according to HCP Live. Analysis of stool samples from 30 patients with and without a history of cardiopulmonary disease revealed specific alterations in the gut microbiota of patients with PAH that allowed investigators to predict PAH with 83% accuracy. The study authors note that more research is needed to determine whether the specific microbiota associated with PAH is the cause or result of the disease.

Social media use and low trust in medical experts were associated with vaccine misinformation, according to Contagion Live. A new survey examined how the use of traditional media versus social media affected the belief in false information about vaccines. Low trust in medical professionals was associated with a greater likelihood of believing false information about vaccines, with distrust being a stronger predictor of misinformation than education, income, age, religion, and conservative news media consumption, the study noted.