Potent Compound May Effectively Treat C. Diff, Reduce Recurrence

Although clostridioides difficile is the leading cause of health care-associated infection in the United States, there are currently only 2 antibiotics available for its treatment: vancomycin and fidaxomicin.

Although clostridioides difficile (C. diff) is the leading cause of health care-associated infection in the United States, there are currently only 2 antibiotics available for its treatment: vancomycin and fidaxomicin. However, both of these antibiotics are known to have high treatment failure and recurrence.

In light of the threat C. diff poses to health systems, researchers at Purdue University developed advanced novel compounds to treat C. diff, which remains 1 of 4 bacteria considered to be an urgent threat by the CDC.

"Our compounds have several advantages, including ultrapotent activities with minimum inhibitory concentration values as low as 0.003 μg/mL," said Herman O. Sintim, drug discovery professor of chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, in a press release. "Our compounds also do not kill good bacteria at concentrations that kill C. diff and performed significantly better than current antibiotics in preventing recurrence. These are significant advantages for patients dealing with this difficult bacterial infection."

The compound developed by the researchers is HSGN-218, which contains trifluoromethylthio functional group. Sintim explained that this compound is one of the most promising of the compounds they have developed at Purdue University, leading them to patent it through the Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization.

Additionally, HSGN-218 may be one of the most potent compounds produced against C. diff to date.

"This is part of our work to create new solutions to treat diseases and infections, which are resistant to current treatment options," Sintim said in the press release. "This work provides a potential clinical lead for the development of C. diff therapeutics and also highlights dramatic drug potency enhancement via halogen substitution."

REFERENCE

Ultrapotent compound may help treat C. diff, reduce recurrence. West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University; September 25, 2020. https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-09/pu-ucm092420.php. Accessed March 10, 2021.