Low Cost EpiPen Competitor Now Sold at CVS

Adrenaclick is about one-sixth of the cost for the EpiPen.

CVS recently announced they are now selling a lower cost epipenepherine injection pen, a direct competitor of Mylan’s EpiPen.

Although Mylan recently launched a generic version of their EpiPen, CVS has chosen to add Adrenaclick (epinephrine injection, USP auto-injector) to their formulary, according to a press release. The auto-injector is available for purchase at all CVS Pharmacy locations.

This authorized generic is sold at the cash price of $109.99 for a 2-pack of the auto-injectors, making it the least expensive epinephrine auto-injector on the market.

CVS reported that selling a less-expensive epinephrine auto-inject was an urgent need for patients with life-threatening allergies who struggled to pay $600 or more for the EpiPen.

Mylan began selling their generic in mid-December 2016, at the price of $300 per 2-pack, which is 50% lower than the cost of the EpiPen. The launch of this authorized generic is in response to recent criticism over the cost of the branded product, which increased in price more than 500% in 10 years. This sparked outrage across the country, with many parents expressing fear that their child would experience an allergic reaction, and not have access to treatment due to the high cost.

Faced with the $600 cost of the EpiPen, the $300 generic, or the $109.99 cost of Adrenaclick, it is likely that many patients will chose the lowest costing option. These drugs all have the same active ingredients, and have been approved by the FDA.

CVS warns that patients should consult their physician before switching treatment to the authorized generic for Adrenaclick to ensure that the new medication will meet their specific medical needs, according to the press release.

“We’re encouraged to see national efforts to make epinephrine auto-injectors more affordable and more available to Americans across the country,” said Cary Sennett, MD, PhD, president and CEO of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. “Partnerships that increase access to vital medications are key in helping those suffering from life-threatening allergies.”