HIV Neutralizing Antibody Proven Successful in Clinical Trial

Antibody well tolerated in patients with HIV.

The monoclonal antibody 10-1074 was well-tolerated, demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic properties, and had high antiviral activity among patients with HIV, a recent study found.

In the study, published by Nature Medicine, the investigators sought to examine the safety and activity of 10-1074. This broadly neutralizing antibody targets the V3 glucan supersite on the HIV envelope protein.

The study included 33 individuals who received a single intravenous infusion of the antibody. The results showed that 10-1074 was well-tolerated, and had a half-life of 24.0 d in individuals without HIV infection and 12.8 d in individuals with HIV.

Thirteen participants with viremia received the highest dose of 30 mg/kg 10-1074, of whom, 11 were 10-1074-sensitive, showing a rapid decline in viremia by a mean of 1.52 log10 copies/ml.

In the first weeks after infusion, a virologic analysis showed the emergence of multiple independent 10-1074-resistant viruses. Additionally, emerging escape variants were generally resistant to the related V3-specific antibody PGT121, according to the study. However, it remained sensitive to antibodies that target non-overlapping epitopes, such as 3BNC117 and VRC01.

The results of the study showed 10-1074’s safety and activity in humans, and further supports the idea that antibodies targeting the V3 glycan supersite might be useful for the treatment and prevention of HIV, the authors concluded.

“These antibodies are highly potent and are able to effectively neutralize a large number of different HIV strains,” said investigator Florian Klein. “Therefore, they play an important role in the quest for and development of an HIV vaccine.”

Further trials have been scheduled for spring to investigate an antibody-mediated treatment approach in patients with HIV.