HIV/AIDS Epidemic Could be Eliminated by 2030

Study finds current efforts are not enough to decrease the spread of infection.

Study finds current efforts are not enough to decrease the spread of infection.

Further action must be taken against the HIV/AIDS epidemic, or the consequences could be dire, according to a study recently published in The Lancet.

The rate of HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention measures is stagnating; the current effort is not enough to decrease the spread of infection, the study noted. The next 5 years is a crucial time frame for the issue. If nothing improves, the epidemic could rise to catastrophic levels. However, if further efforts are made, it could mean an end to the AIDS epidemic by 2030, according to the study.

The researchers determined that more effort from the most affected nations, international investment, and more efficient use of resources are needed to make this happen. Currently, the most affected African countries must use 2% of their GDPs, and one-third of their government health expenditures from 2015-2030 to handle the epidemic. From these figures, it is clear that in order for improvement to begin, international aid is needed.

In addition to an increase in resources, enhanced efficiency is also required. Beyond making treatment easily accessible, efforts should be furthered to prevent HIV infection from the very beginning, the study noted.

One of the greatest factors in the resurgence of this epidemic comes from lack of proper attention. Even nations where HIV was previously controlled — such as Western Europe and North America - have shown infection rates to be increasing due to carelessness with sexual protection. More regulation in giving access to treatment and programs is critical in efforts to decrease HIV infection.

The study lists 7 steps that nations must take in order to control the spread of HIV infection worldwide:

  • Scale up AIDS efforts
  • Get serious about HIV prevention
  • Continue expanding access to treatment
  • Mobilize resources
  • Governance and accountability for HIV and health
  • Ground AIDS response in human rights
  • Create practical solutions to changes laws, policies, and attitudes