Help on the Home Front Can Ease BP

Pharmacy Times, Volume 0,0

According to the results of a study presented at the2005 American Heart Association's High Blood PressureResearch meeting, a supportive spouse might helplower the negative impact job stress can have on a person'sblood pressure (BP). Researchers reported thefindings of a study that followed 216 men and women,aged 40 to 65 years, over the course of a year. At baseline,34% of patients had a BP of 130/80 mm Hg or higher.None were receiving any type of BP treatment.

The results of the study showed that job strain had asignificant impact on BP, both clinically and statistically,according to lead author Sheldon Tobe, MD, assistantprofessor of medicine at the University of Toronto,Ontario, Canada.

Job strain and low marital cohesion (lack of emotionalspousal support) were related to an increase in systolicBP of 2.8 mm Hg over 1 year. High marital cohesionalong with job strain was related to a decrease in systolicBP of 2.5 mm Hg in the same time frame. Dr. Tobe suggeststhat people who experience job strain and/or lowmarital cohesion should have their BP checked.