Novel Psychedelic Treatment Approach Bypasses Hallucinogenic Effects to Allow Widespread Adoption

Ron Aung-Din, MD, the clinical medical advisor of Pyscheceutical, and Chad Harman, the CEO of Pyscheceutical, discuss a novel approach for administering psychedelics for the treatment of brain disorders that does not induce hallucinogenic effects.

Pharmacy Times interviewed Ron Aung-Din, MD, the clinical medical advisor of Pyscheceutical, and Chad Harman, the CEO of Pyscheceutical, on a novel approach to administering psychedelics for the treatment of brain disorders that does not induce hallucinogenic effects.

Aung-Din explained that the term psychedelic came about to identify compounds that can cause out-of-body experiences and even psychosis when consumed.

“Many drugs that we use in neurology which are now authorized to be used by the FDA can have those mind-altering effects too when used in high doses, but the term psychedelic specifically applies to things like LSD and psilocybin and such, which are known for their psychiatric and psychogenic properties, and which have been used in religious rituals or by people who want to have that experience,” Aung-Din said.

Aung-Din noted that the hallucinogenic effects of psychedelics are due to their presence in the blood when administered, leading them to hit receptors in the brain that can induce out-of-body experiences.

However, the traditional drugs being used pharmaceutically for conditions such as PTSD, severe mood disorders, and psychosis continue to have limitations in relation to efficacy, leading people to turn to alternative treatment avenues, such as psychedelics, to meet their unmet need.

“Just like what happened with cannabis and CBD use, which came about as a result of the inability for traditional pharmaceuticals to treat seizures, for instance,” Aung-Din said. “We're looking to psychedelics because of the potential use in medicine. They have certain characteristics which traditional pharmaceuticals do not have.”

However, Aung-Din explained that the hallucinogenic adverse effects of psychedelic medicine remain a limitation for its widespread adoption for therapeutic use. In order to address this, Aung-Din developed an administration method that does not get into the blood stream.

“This allows drugs to be used non-systemically. They are applied as a cream or a patch at the back of the neck of the hairline, where there are free nerve endings in the skin under the surface, which go right to the brain,” Aung-Din said. “We have therapeutic results within 5 to 10 minutes without evidence in blood flow or systemic side effects, and this makes it ideal for the use of drugs such as psychedelics where we don't want the systemic effects.”