Ivosidenib as Monotherapy Granted FDA Approval for Certain Patients with IDH1 Mutant AML

The sNDA was granted Priority Review and accepted under the agency's Real-Time Oncology Review pilot program, which aims to make the review of oncology drugs more efficient by allowing the FDA access to clinical trial data before the information is formally submitted to the agency.

Officials with the FDA have approved a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) to update the US Prescribing Information for Agios Pharmaceuticals’ ivosidenib (Tibsovo), an isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1) inhibitor, to include adult patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with a susceptible IDH1 mutation as detected by an FDA-approved test. The update is indicated for these patients who are age 75 years and older or who have comorbidities that preclude use of intensive induction chemotherapy.

The sNDA was granted Priority Review and accepted under the agency's Real-Time Oncology Review pilot program, which aims to make the review of oncology drugs more efficient by allowing the FDA access to clinical trial data before the information is formally submitted to the agency. Ivosidenib received initial FDA approval in July 2018 for adult patients with relapsed or refractory (R/R) AML and an IDH1 mutation, according to Agios.

“Despite several new AML medicines approved in the last two years, many newly diagnosed patients are still not eligible for existing therapies or combination regimens because of age and other comorbidities,” said Chris Bowden, MD, chief medical officer at Agios. “With today’s additional Tibsovo approval, we are now able to provide a targeted, oral therapy to patients with an IDH1 mutation who may not have other treatment options. In addition, we are continuing our work to expand the utility of Tibsovo in newly diagnosed AML patients in ongoing Phase 3 trials in combination with both intensive chemotherapy and azacitidine.”

AML patients are typically older or have comorbidities that preclude the use of intensive chemotherapy4. These patients typically have a worse prognosis and poor outcomes5. The majority of patients with AML eventually relapse6. The 5-year survival rate is approximately 28%2. For 6 to 10 percent of AML patients, the mutated IDH1 enzyme blocks normal blood stem cell differentiation, contributing to the genesis of acute leukemia7. IDH1 mutations have been associated with negative prognosis in AML8,9.

According to Gail J. Roboz, MD, Professor of Medicine, Director of the Leukemia Program and a member of the Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, the Phase 1 results for Agios’ ivosidenib demonstrated that this oral, single agent therapy can induce durable responses in newly diagnosed AML patients with an IDH1 mutation.

To read the rest of this article, visit the Pharmacy Times website.