Genetic Engineering May Reduce CAR T Treatment Toxicity in AML

Article

Using gene editing to remove CD33, a protein targeted to treat acute myeloid leukemia with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, from healthy stem cells could reduce toxicity experienced by CAR T-cell therapy.

Using gene editing to remove CD33, a protein targeted to treat acute myeloid leukemia with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, from healthy stem cells could reduce toxicity experienced by CAR T-cell therapy, according to a study

published in Cell

.

A group of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) and collaborators at the National Institutes of Health hypothesized that deleting CD33 from healthy cells could create an antigen that only targets the cancerous cells.

Previous attempts to target CD33 with CAR T therapies have damaged healthy cells. When CAR T cells are used short term, the damage is prevented, but that goes against the purpose of the treatment, which is to ensure CAR T cells remain in circulation within the body for years, thereby preventing relapse.

Click to continue reading on The American Journal of Managed Care.

Related Videos
biosimilar word or concept represented by wooden letter tiles on a wooden table with glasses and a book | Image Credit: lexiconimages - stock.adobe.com
Image credit: alicja neumiler | stock.adobe.com
Laboratory test tubes and solution with stethoscope background | Image Credit: Shutter2U - stock.adobe.com
Laboratory test tubes and solution with stethoscope background | Image Credit: Shutter2U - stock.adobe.com
Image credit: Krakenimages.com | stock.adobe.com
Human brain digital illustration. Electrical activity, flashes, and lightning on a blue background. | Image Credit: Siarhei - stock.adobe.com
Physician and kidneys
Image credit: gamjai - stock.adobe.com
© 2024 MJH Life Sciences

All rights reserved.