Do Not Use Compounded Drugs Stored in Some BD Syringes

Pharmacists should not use compounded drugs stored in 3-mL and 5-mL syringes from Becton-Dickinson unless no suitable alternatives are available, the FDA warns.

Pharmacists should not use compounded drugs stored in 3-mL and 5-mL syringes from Becton-Dickinson (BD) unless no suitable alternatives are available, the FDA warns.

This is because compounded or repackaged products stored in these syringes—such as fentanyl, morphine, and methadone—may lose potency over time due to potential interaction with the syringe’s rubber stopper. BD’s 10-ml, 20-ml, and 30-ml syringes may also contain the same stopper.

In light of this, the company is alerting customers not to use these syringes as a closed container system for compounded and repackaged drugs.

“If you have been using products packaged in these syringes, be aware that using a substitute product may require a dosage adjustment in case the patient has been receiving a subpotent product, or adverse consequences could occur,” the FDA wrote in its warning.

Pharmacy staff should check supplies and remove drugs filled by pharmacies or outsourcing facilities that are stored in general purpose 3-mL and 5-mL syringes marked with the BD logo at the base.

Any adverse side effects should be reported to the FDA’s MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program.

The FDA noted that this warning does not apply to drugs stored in approved pre-filled syringes, but it may extend to general use syringes from other manufacturers that are not cleared for closed-container storage usage.