Canagliflozin Shows Superior Glycemic Control Than Dapagliflozin in Type 2 Diabetes

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Patients with diabetes taking canagliflozin achieved better glycemic control, were less likely to stop taking the medication, and were less likely to switch to another drug.

A recently published study that compared patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) taking the highest dose of canagliflozin (Invokana, Janssen) with those taking the highest dose of dapagliflozin (Farxiga, AstraZeneca) has found that those taking canagliflozin achieved better glycemic control, were less likely to stop taking the medication, and were less likely to switch to another drug.

The study, which appeared online April 20, 2018, in Current Medical Research and Opinion, is the first real-world study comparing the 2 sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, which received FDA approval in March 2013 (canagliflozin) and January 2014 (dapagliflozin) to treat patients with T2D. Janssen Scientific Affairs funded the study.

"Controlling blood glucose levels is central to diabetes treatment because it can reduce the risk of diabetes-related complications, such as kidney disease, retinopathy, and potentially cardiovascular disease," said Lawrence Blonde, MD, lead author of the study, in a statement. Blonde is the director of the Ochsner Diabetes Clinical Research Unit, Frank Riddick Diabetes Institute, in the Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana.

“This first real-world analysis comparing SGLT2 [inhibitor] therapies in adults with type 2 diabetes showed that canagliflozin 300 mg each day allowed more patients to achieve blood glucose control [A1C <7%] than did a daily dose of dapagliflozin 10 mg,” Blonde said.

Click to continue reading on The American Journal of Managed Care.

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