Siponimod Reduces Disability Progression in Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

New analysis from a phase 3 trial reports that oral, once-daily siponimod (BAF312) consistently reduced disability progression in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

New analysis from a phase 3 trial reports that oral, once-daily siponimod (BAF312) consistently reduced disability progression in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS).

Post-hoc analysis details from Novartis’ EXPAND study — presented Friday at the 70

th

annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology in Los Angeles, CA — have lead researchers to believe the therapy that such risk reduction with siponimod is substantially disassociated from MS relapse.

Siponimod is a selective modulator of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor subtypes. It functions by binding to the S1P1 sub-receptor on lymphocytes, preventing them from entering the central nervous system (CNS). The therapy also has the capability to enter the CNS and modulate damaging cell activity, giving it the potential to treat neurological function loss in patients with MS

The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial to compare the efficacy and safety of siponimod versus placebo in people with SPMS was the largest of its kind to investigate a therapy for SPMS, with 1,651 participants enrolled from 31 countries. On average, patients were 48 years old, had been living with MS for about 17 years, and had been demonstrating disability progression in the 2 years prior to the study start. They also reported an Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS) between 3.0-6.5, indicating the use of a unilateral walking aid.

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