Hyponatremia Worsens Pneumonia Symptoms in Hospitalized Kids

Article

A recent study finds that hyponatremia may increase pneumonia severity in hospitalized children.

A recent study published in Neurobiology of Respiration finds that hyponatremia is common among children hospitalized with pneumonia and that the condition is associated with increased disease severity. Researchers from Poland conducted a retrospective analysis of more than 300 children aged 33 days to 16 years who had been hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. Children with hyponatremia tended to have higher neutrophil counts, higher C-reactive protein, higher body temperature, and longer hospital stays than children with healthy serum sodium levels. However, hyponatremia was not associated with breath frequency, heart rate, capillary blood saturation, time for defeverscence, or time of antibiotic treatment.

To read the full article on this study at HCPLive.com, click here.

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