Pharmacist Sentenced for Selling Fake Drugs Released Early from Prison

A pharmacist sentenced to 4 years in prison for charges related to the sale of counterfeit medications has been released from prison early.

A pharmacist sentenced to 4 years in prison for charges related to the sale of counterfeit medications has been released from prison early.

Andrew Strempler, 41, was originally sentenced in the United States for conspiracy to commit mail fraud back in 2013.

The former Canadian pharmacist was found to have sold counterfeit medications online to US customers. An FDA investigation revealed that 90% of the US-bound seized medications, including Lipitor and Arimidex, were counterfeit, The Wall Street Journal reported.

Now, CBC News is reporting that the former pharmacist was released from prison on October 26, 2015, having served two-thirds of his prison sentence.

“The board assesses that you are manageable in the community and do not pose an undue risk under the structure of statutory release in concert with imposed conditions,” the parole board stated.

Stempler will not be able to own or operate a business, and he must provide documented financial information to his parole supervisor until January 2016, CBC News reported.

In addition to prison tune, Strempler was required to forfeit $300,000 and pay a $25,000 fine, according to The Wall Street Journal.

The former pharmacist sold prescription drugs to Americans between 2001 and 2006. He first received an FDA warning letter in 2001 that accused him of shipping unapproved drugs to the United States.

He later used a distribution center in the Bahamas to hide his activities from the FDA, but the agency discovered shipments in Miami, Florida, in June 2006, and testing revealed that the drugs were counterfeit.

Strempler’s Canadian pharmacy license was revoked in 2009, according to The Wall Street Journal.