Gerontological Society of America Releases Study on Cost of Alzheimer Disease

The report also describes the benefits of interventions at the family, individual, institutional, organizational, and policy levels and differentiates AD from other types of dementia.

More than half of individuals approaching or in older adulthood report Alzheimer disease and related dementias (ADRD) as the condition they fear most, even greater than more common but treatable conditions, such as cancer, heart disease, and stroke, the results of a new report show.

Additionally, individuals underestimate the toll associated with these conditions for families of patients, particularly on caregivers, the investigators said.

The report, which was developed by the Gerontological Society of America and supported by Bank of America, differentiates Alzheimer disease (AD) from cognitive decline and other types of dementia; describes the benefits of interventions at the family, individual, institutional, organizational, and policy levels; and documents the direct and indirect costs.

“This report uses data to show how the onset of ADRD occurs at earlier ages among people of color, often causing them to leave the workforce and therefore have less wealth and fewer options for dealing with dementias and their costs,” Ishan Williams, PhD, FGSA, of the University of Virginia, said in a statement.

She said the financial impact on caregivers is about $300,000 when the loss and reduction of employment is considered, combined with losses to pensions, retirement, and Social Security benefits, as well as out-of-pocket expenses.

Over the past 3 years, the organizations have explored the increasingly long lifespans of Americans through economic, fitness, diversity, and now cognitive health lenses.

Reference

Hidden financial dimensions affect people with cognitive decline and their care partners, report says. EurekAlert. News release. November 9, 2021. Accessed November 10, 2021. https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/934278