Migraine Identified as Possible Risk Factor for Silent Stroke

Published Online: Wednesday, June 11, 2014
Follow Pharmacy_Times:
Patients with a history of migraines may be more likely to experience silent brain injury, the results of a recent study suggest. The study, published online on May 15, 2014, in Stroke, analyzed imaging and migraine data for 546 patients from the Northern Manhattan Study, looking for associations between migraine and subclinical brain infarction. The results indicated that patients who reported having migraines were twice as likely to experience subclinical brain infarction when compared with those without migraines. The researchers of the study suggest that migraine patients with vascular risk factors should make lifestyle changes in order to reduce their risk for stroke.

The researchers pointed out (1) that this study was not designed to prove that migraines cause stroke and (2) that more studies are needed to confirm their findings.

Related Articles
Ian Dilley, Purdue College of Pharmacy student, said pharmacists should strive to show compassion and empathy.
The FDA today approved sumatriptan and naproxen sodium to treat migraines in patients aged 12 to 17 years.
Ian Dilley, Purdue College of Pharmacy student, talks about the exciting passion for pharmacy among students at the 2015 APhA Annual Meeting and Exposition.
Ian Dilley, Purdue College of Pharmacy student, said a common misconception about pharmacists relates to the scope of their practice.
$vacMongoViewPlus$
Latest Issues
  • photo
    Pharmacy Times
    photo
    Health-System Edition
    photo
    Directions in Pharmacy
    photo
    OTC Guide
    photo
    Generic Supplements
  • photo
    Pharmacy Careers
    photo
    Specialty Pharmacy Times
    photo
    Generic
$auto_registration$