Study Finds Less Sleep Raises Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

Published Online: Monday, January 14, 2013
Follow Pharmacy_Times:
According to a study published in the December 2012 issue of Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, diabetes patients who do not get enough sleep may be at a greater risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD).

The researchers analyzed the risk of CVD in hypertensive patients with and without diabetes in Japan. To assess the impact of diabetes combined with short sleep duration on CVD risk, participants were split into 4 groups: diabetes present with short sleep duration, diabetes present with long sleep duration, diabetes absent with short sleep duration, and diabetes absent with long sleep duration.

Short sleep duration was defined as less than 7.5 hours of sleep, and participants recorded their own sleep duration in diaries. CVD events included heart attack, stroke, sudden cardiac death, angina, heart failure, and end-stage renal disease.

The researchers performed the experiment twice, following the first group of participants for 6 years and the second group for 10 years. Researchers reviewed the patients’ medical records once every year to record any CVD events.

The researchers found that the group of diabetes patients with short sleep duration had a significantly higher amount of CVD events compared with all other groups. The researchers also found a connection between glycemic control, short sleep duration, and CVD incidents, concluding that these conditions may increase risk of CVD as well.

Related Articles
Diabetes mellitus diagnoses are soaring in numbers, with the elderly population disproportionately affected. The APhA featured a case-based presentation at its 2015 annual meeting in San Diego, CA, that discussed diabetes management’s complexities in older adults.
States that expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act have seen a 23% increase in the number of newly diagnosed diabetes patients.
The FDA has approved a new treatment for 1 of the most common diabetic eye diseases.
Patients with limited life expectancy may see improvement in their quality of life if they stop taking statins.
Latest Issues
  • photo
    Pharmacy Times
    photo
    Health-System Edition
    photo
    Directions in Pharmacy
    photo
    OTC Guide
    photo
    Generic Supplements
  • photo
    Pharmacy Careers
    photo
    Specialty Pharmacy Times
    photo
    Generic
$auto_registration$