Adenotonsillectomy for Childhood Sleep Apnea

Michele Reed, PharmD, RPh
Published Online: Tuesday, August 6, 2013
Follow Pharmacy_Times:
A recently published study evaluated the effect of early adenotonsillectomy on polysomnographic, cognitive, behavioral, and health outcomes assessed over a 7-month period.1 A total of 464 children aged 5 to 9 years with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome were randomized to a strategy of watchful waiting or early adenotonsillectomy, and outcomes were assessed at baseline and at 7 months. The primary outcome was the attention and executive-function score on the Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment.

Results showed no significant change from baseline to follow-up for the primary outcome of attention and executive-function score (mean [±SD] improvement, 7.1 ± 13.9 in the early-adenotonsillectomy group, and 5.1 ± 13.4 in the watchful-waiting group; P = .16).

Significant improvements were demonstrated in the secondary end points of behavior, quality of life, polysomnographic findings, and reduction in symptoms in the early-adenotonsillectomy group compared with the watchful-waiting group. The authors concluded that the study demonstrates beneficial effects of early adenotonsillectomy with regard to behavior, quality of life, and polysomnographic findings; however, early adenotonsillectomy did not significantly improve attention or executive function as measured by neuropsychological testing.


Dr. Reed is a freelance writer in Fairless Hills, Pennsylvania.

References
  1. Marcus CL, Moore RH, Rosen CL, et al. A randomized trial of adenotonsillectomy for childhood sleep apnea. N Engl J Med. 2013;368(25):2366-2376.
  2. Leuppi JD, Schuetz P, Bingisser R, et al. Short-term vs conventional glucocorticoid therapy in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the REDUCE randomized clinical trial. JAMA. 2013;309(21):2223-2231.
  3. Buchs NC, Konrad-Mugnier B, Jannot AS, et al. Assessment of recurrence and complications following uncomplicated diverticulitis. Br J Surg. 2013;100(7):976-979.


Related Articles
A new study led by researchers from the Center for Pediatric Genomic Medicine at Children’s Mercy-Kansas City proves that genomic diagnostic testing can directly impact the care of children and infants with neurologic disorders.
More than 40% of calls placed to US poison control centers concerning energy drinks involve children under age 6, some of whom suffer serious cardiac and neurological symptoms.
The FDA today approved the first vaccine licensed in the United States to prevent invasive serogroup B meningococcal disease in patients aged 10 to 25 years.
Agave nectar and placebo may be more effective in treating a child’s cough than “watchful waiting” with no treatment at all.
Latest Issues
$auto_registration$