Case Studies

Diana M. Sobieraj, PharmD, and Craig I. Coleman, PharmD
Published Online: Thursday, April 18, 2013
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Case 1:
Azithromycin and arrhythmias

MJ is a 45-year-old female patient who has a history of a purulent cough with a fever for 3 days. She complained of chest pain and difficulty breathing, and has no remarkable medical history. MJ made an appointment to see her primary care physician, who determined she had community-acquired pneumonia. MJ was given a prescription for azithromycin 250-mg tablets with instructions to take 2 tablets today and 1 tablet daily for the next 4 days. MJ approaches your pharmacy counter and is concerned because not long ago she saw a news story about the risk of azithromycin causing heart rhythm abnormalities. She asks if you believe she is at risk and if she should take the azithromycin?

Case 2:
Pertussis vaccination and pregnancy
SD is a 30-year-old female patient who is 30 weeks pregnant and is a patient at your pharmacy. She notices that you are able to administer vaccinations and proceeds to tell you about her best friend whose baby was diagnosed with pertussis when she was 2 months old. SD expressed that she is very concerned given the increased incidence of pertussis this year and how much her friend’s baby suffered. SD would like to know if there are any immunizations she is a candidate for that will provide her baby protection from pertussis. 


Dr. Sobieraj is assistant professor of pharmacy practice and Dr. Coleman is associate professor of pharmacy practice and director of the pharmacoeconomics and outcomes studies group at the University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy.


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