Weight Gain From ICSs Has Greater Impact on Women

Published Online: Monday, November 12, 2012
Women with asthma are more likely to gain weight from inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) than men, according to a recent study published by the International Scholarly Research Network Pulmonology.

The study included 180 patients between 18 and 75 years with physician-diagnosed asthma in Montreal, Canada. Researchers interviewed participants on their overall medical history, asthma history, height, and weight. Participants then completed the same interview after 1 year. Researchers used statistical analysis to test the relationship between ICS dosage and sex and its effect on weight. Age, smoking status, and duration of asthma were taken into consideration while compiling results.

Results showed that women taking higher dosages of ICSs gained more weight over 1 year, with an average gain of 2.1 lb. Men, however, lost weight with higher doses of ICSs, with an average loss of 2.9 lb.

The findings suggest an association between asthma and weight gain in women. “Further research is needed to clarify the extent to which this relationship is influenced by sex hormones, dietary and exercise behaviours, and medication adherence, in order to further elucidate possible mechanisms,” the researchers noted.


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