Deep Breath: Optimizing Selection and Use of Medication Devices in COPD

Kyle Copeland, PharmD
Published Online: Monday, July 23, 2012
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Deep Breath: Optimizing Selection and Use of Medication Devices in COPD
 
Kyle Copeland, PharmD

Clinical Pharmacist Specialist
Parkwest Medical Center
Knoxville, Tennessee

 

 
Kyle Copeland, PharmD, has no relevant affiliations or financial relationships with commercial interests to disclose related to this activity.
 
Pharmacy Times Office of Continuing Professional Education Planning Staff
 
Judy V. Lum, MPA, Ann C. Lichti, CCMEP, and Elena Beyzarov, PharmD, have no relevant affiliations or financial relationships with commercial interests to disclose related to this activity.
 
Pharmacy Times Editorial

Jennifer Whartenby and David Allikas have no relevant affiliations or financial relationships with commercial interests to disclose related to this activity.
 

 
Educational Objectives
 
Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:
  1. Examine current prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment of COPD.
  2. Apply current guideline recommendations to improve standards of care and patient outcomes.
  3. Explore a patient-specific approach to managing difficult-to-treat patients with COPD.
  4. Discuss proper selection and use of currently available medication devices for COPD.
Target audience: Pharmacists
Type of activity: Knowledge
Release date: July 4, 2012
Expiration date: July 4, 2014
Estimated time to complete activity: 2 hours
Fee: This lesson is free online.
 
Click here to view this activity.

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