Antidepressants' Link to New-Onset Diabetes

Published Online: Friday, December 14, 2012
Follow Pharmacy_Times:
Long-term use of antidepressants may increase the risk of diabetes in elderly patients, according to a study published online on November 23, 2012, by the Journal of Diabetes.

The study looked at data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey of elderly Medicare beneficiaries. Diabetes data were collected over a 3-year period. Researchers examined the association between antidepressant use, depression, and new-onset diabetes. The data were adjusted for demographic, socioeconomic, and lifestyle risk factors.

Participants who used antidepressants during the 3-year period were 50% more likely to have new-onset diabetes than patients who did not use antidepressants. Patients who were diagnosed with any depression were twice as likely to develop diabetes than those without depression. However, there was no significant correlation between antidepressant use and new onset diabetes in patients with diagnosed depression.

The researchers conclude that depression may independently increase the risk of diabetes. They also suggest that long-term use of antidepressants without a depression diagnosis increases the risk for diabetes. The researchers state that if the study results are repeated with additional research, they could impact clinical decisionmaking.

Related Articles
Galleon Pharmaceuticals Corp's GAL-021 reverses and prevents respiratory depression associated with opioid use without affecting analgesia.
Pharmacy’s Greatest Obstacle to Expanded Patient Care Roles
The FDA has approved the first needle-free device for injecting the Afluria influenza vaccine in adult patients aged 18 to 64 years.
The FDA has approved the first zinc transporter 8 autoantibody test that may help patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus receive more timely diagnosis and treatment for the disease.
Latest Issues
$auto_registration$