Effect of Telephonic Patient Support on Opioid Dependence

Michele Reed, PharmD
Published Online: Thursday, August 16, 2012
Follow Pharmacy_Times:
A recent study evaluated the impact of telephone patient support on treatment compliance and outcomes in opioid dependent patients (n = 1426) receiving buprenorphine therapy.2

Study subjects were randomized to receive buprenorphine alone or buprenorphine plus the telephonic patient support program.

Results showed that patients enrolled in the patient support program accepting at least 3 care coach intervention calls had better compliance with buprenorphine compared with the buprenorphine alone group at 12 months (64.4% vs 56.1%, respectively; P <.025).

Additionally, compliant patients reported lower Addiction Severity Index scores than noncompliant patients.

Authors concluded that the telephonic support program improved buprenorphine compliance and thus indirectly improved patient treatment outcomes.


Dr. Reed received her doctor of pharmacy degree from the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and currently works as a medical editor in the greater Philadelphia area.

References
1. Ebbeling CB, Swain JF, Feldman HA, et al. Effects of dietary composition on energy expenditure during weight-loss maintenance. JAMA. 2012;307(24):2627-2634.
2. Jakicic JM, Tate DF, Lang W, et al. Effect of a stepped-care intervention approach on weight loss in adults: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA. 2012;307(24):2617-2626.
3. Mohr DC, Ho J, Duffecy J, et al. Effect of telephone-administered vs face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy on adherence to therapy and depression outcomes among primary care patients: a randomized trial. JAMA. 2012;307(21):2278-2285.

Related Articles
Jeff Fudin, PharmD, FCCP, argues that the way to make hydrocodone combination products safer for patients is to provide more education for those who prescribe the medications and pharmacists who dispense them.
Mary Lynn McPherson, PharmD, explains how rescheduling hydrocodone combination products as Schedule II drugs will help reduce levels of abuse.
Opioid abusers who prefer oxycodone cited the quality of the high as the primary reason behind their choice, while those who prefer hydrocodone were more likely to cite its accessibility, a new study finds.
Latest Issues
$auto_registration$