Case Studies

Craig I. Coleman, PharmD, and Charles W. Jones, PharmD Candidate
Published Online: Monday, September 19, 2011
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Case 1

BC is a 24-year-old man who presents to your New England pharmacy concerned that he may have contracted Lyme disease. He states that he found a tick attached to the back of his left leg. He reports that he believes the tick must have attached to him 2 days ago when he was mowing his lawn. BC removed the tick with tweezers 1 hour ago and placed the tick in plastic bag to show a pharmacist. BC is aware of the high prevalence of Lyme disease in the area and also knows several neighbors that have been diagnosed. BC asks, “What should I do now?”

How should the pharmacist counsel BC?

Case 2

JB is a 66-year-old man who has been in the hospital recovering from an acute ischemic stroke. After receiving alteplase, JB has made excellent progress and is preparing for discharge. His past medical history is significant only for hypertension. The resident writes prescriptions for a statin and some additional antihypertensive medications. The resident wants to start antiplatelet therapy as well, but is unsure of the most appropriate agent to use. The resident contacts the clinical pharmacist seeking a recommendation.

How should the pharmacist handle this prescription?

 


Dr. Coleman is associate professor of pharmacy practice and director of the pharmacoeconomics and outcomes studies group at the University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy.  Mr. Perugini is a PharmD candidate from the University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy.



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