Lower Bone Density in Women with Diabetes

Published Online: Wednesday, March 1, 2006

A recent study by the University of Pittsburgh found that premenopausal women with type 1 diabetes have lower bone density and more fractures than their counterparts without diabetes. The study included 237 women without the disease and 67 women with type 1 diabetes, all of whom were between 35 and 55 years of age.

Type 1 diabetes was associated with lower bone mineral density—3% to 8% lower, compared with that in control women. Women with type 1 diabetes also were more likely to report a fracture after age 20 than nondiabetic women (33.3% vs 22.6%). It was not clear what the correlation was, however. Both groups of women exercised similarly, and the women with diabetes were more likely to be taking bone-restoring osteoporosis medications and vitamin D supplements.

Researchers suggest that women with type 1 diabetes should be targeted for osteoporosis screening and possible fracture prevention as they transition through menopause. The results of the study were published in the February 2006 issue of Diabetes Care.




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