Circumcision Lowers HIV Risk

Published Online: Tuesday, June 1, 2004

Whereas circumcision may not protect against other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), it may cut HIV risk. A study, the results of which were reported recently in The Lancet, found that circumcised men may be up to 6 times less likely to be infected by HIV-1, compared with uncircumcised men. The researchers concluded that this difference in risk may be because the foreskin on uncircumcised males is enriched with cells that are targets for HIV-1.

For the study, American and Indian researchers evaluated 2298 men coming to STI clinics in India. At the beginning of the study, all of the participants were HIV-negative. A majority of the participants were assessed 3 times over the course of the year after their initial assessment.

"These data confirm previous findings that male circumcision reduces the risk of HIV-1 acquisition," said researcher Robert C. Bollinger, MD. "This analysis expands on earlier studies by including laboratory-defined incident STIs as outcomes in the analysis, as well as by including risk behavior to control for other potential differences between circumcised and uncircumcised men."



Related Articles
No Result Found
Latest Issues
$auto_registration$