Fraudulent Antiaging Medicine Harmful to Biogerontology Field

MARCH 01, 2003

International experts in biogerontology frequently speak out strongly against ?phony? antiaging medicine, but a backlash from their actions may undermine their own antiaging research. In an effort to discredit what they believe to be fraudulent or harmful ?fountain of youth? products, a handful of legitimate antiaging researchers have begun a campaign to distinguish their research from the products and claims of entrepreneurs selling hormone injections, special mineral waters, and other antiaging products. Many biogerontologists are working on developing treatments that will slow or stop the processes of aging, and they fear that pseudoscientific research will hinder funding of valid research.

Professor Robert H. Binstock, of Case Western Reserve University, who is following the debate, feels that the biogerontologists are undermining their own work by confusing the public?s perceptions of real research versus commercial ventures. By focusing on the benefits of legitimate research and its contributions to active longevity and functional independence, suggests Binstock, funding and perception will not be adversely affected.



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