Quitting Smoling After Age 65 Adds Years To Life

JULY 01, 2002

A new study has shown that even elderly people who quit smoking can add 1.5 to 4 years to their life. A study reported in the
American Journal of Public Health examined 15 years of data from the Cancer Prevention Study II. Because the data were derived from a large, national sample, the researchers were able to compare the life span for people who stopped smoking with that of people who continued smoking or never smoked.

The reduced life span associated with smoking can be altered at all stages of life.

Quitting: Years Added to Life

Age Upon

   

Quitting

Men

Women

35

6.9-8.5

6.1-7.7

45

5.6-7.1

5.6-7.2

55

3.4-4.8

4.2-5.6

65

1.4-2

2.7-3.7

 


SHARE THIS SHARE THIS
0
 

In Seniors: Consider CMV Serostatus
When Recommending Flu Vaccine

Older people who have cytomegalovirus seem to have less robust responses to the trivalent influenza vaccine than those who do not have CMV.


 

 

Conference Coverage
News from the year's biggest meetings


Pharmacist Education
Clinical features with downloadable PDFs


 

SIGN UP FOR THE PHARMACY TIMES NEWSLETTER
Personalize the information you receive by selecting targeted content and special offers.