Quitting Smoling After Age 65 Adds Years To Life

Published Online: Monday, July 1, 2002

A new study has shown that even elderly people who quit smoking can add 1.5 to 4 years to their life. A study reported in the
American Journal of Public Health examined 15 years of data from the Cancer Prevention Study II. Because the data were derived from a large, national sample, the researchers were able to compare the life span for people who stopped smoking with that of people who continued smoking or never smoked.

The reduced life span associated with smoking can be altered at all stages of life.

Quitting: Years Added to Life

Age Upon

   

Quitting

Men

Women

35

6.9-8.5

6.1-7.7

45

5.6-7.1

5.6-7.2

55

3.4-4.8

4.2-5.6

65

1.4-2

2.7-3.7

 


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