Hepatitis C Patients with HIV Co-Infection Vulnerable to Serious Liver Disease Despite Antiretroviral Therapy

Published Online: Friday, May 23, 2014
Follow Pharmacy_Times:
A study finds that patients co-infected with hepatitis C and HIV who are receiving antiretroviral therapy are 80% more likely to have serious liver disease than those with hepatitis C alone.

Co-infection with HIV in addition to hepatitis C virus (HCV) carries a higher risk of serious liver disease in patients even when they are receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) than that found in patients with HCV alone, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania.
 
The study, published in the March 18, 2014, issue of Annals of Internal Medicine, compared outcomes in patients co-infected with HIV and HCV who were undergoing ART treatment with patients who have chronic HCV alone. HCV co-infection occurs in 10% to 30% of HIV-infected patients, according to the study authors.
 
To read the rest of this article on SpecialtyPharmacyTimes.com, click here.

Related Articles
Many patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease also have low vitamin D levels.
This continuing education activity is supported by educational grants from Bristol-Myers Squibb and Gilead Sciences, Inc.
A recent study has identified how chronic hepatitis infection can pave the way to liver cancer.
AbbVie and Gilead are fighting over hepatitis C drug market share.
Latest Issues
  • photo
    Pharmacy Times
    photo
    Health-System Edition
    photo
    Directions in Pharmacy
    photo
    OTC Guide
    photo
    Generic Supplements
  • photo
    Pharmacy Careers
    photo
    Specialty Pharmacy Times
    photo
    Generic
$auto_registration$