Hepatitis C Patients with HIV Co-Infection Vulnerable to Serious Liver Disease Despite Antiretroviral Therapy

Published Online: Friday, May 23, 2014
A study finds that patients co-infected with hepatitis C and HIV who are receiving antiretroviral therapy are 80% more likely to have serious liver disease than those with hepatitis C alone.

Co-infection with HIV in addition to hepatitis C virus (HCV) carries a higher risk of serious liver disease in patients even when they are receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) than that found in patients with HCV alone, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania.
The study, published in the March 18, 2014, issue of Annals of Internal Medicine, compared outcomes in patients co-infected with HIV and HCV who were undergoing ART treatment with patients who have chronic HCV alone. HCV co-infection occurs in 10% to 30% of HIV-infected patients, according to the study authors.
To read the rest of this article on SpecialtyPharmacyTimes.com, click here.

Latest Articles
James Schiffer, RPh, associate at Allegaert Berger & Vogel LLC, discusses some tips for pharmacists who are facing a Drug Enforcement Administration audit.
Carlos Aquino, founder and president of PharmaDiversion LLC, talks about the importance of the Drug Enforcement Administration's (DEA) diversion website.
Having trouble getting your hands on FluMist?
Novartis is paying $390 million to settle charges that it paid kickbacks to pharmacies to encourage drug sales.
Latest Issues