Beth Lofgren, PharmD, BCPS
Beth Lofgren, PharmD, BCPS
Beth Lofgren, PharmD, BCPS, received her PharmD degree from the University of Tennessee at Memphis in 1999, after completing a BS at the University of Tennessee at Martin. She started her pharmacy career in retail and has practiced in home health, long-term care, and hospital pharmacy. She has also been blogging as the Blonde Pharmacist since 2004, focusing on education for peers and provider status for pharmacists.

A Look Back at 2015 Pharmacy Resolutions

DECEMBER 21, 2015
Every year, I start out with the best intentions to achieve my New Year’s resolutions.
 
A new year means a new start and outlook on goals for yourself and your profession. Year after year, I keep a notebook of what I want to accomplish.
 
This month, I’ve decided to look back at what I had wanted to accomplish as a pharmacist this year and then set out new ideas for next year.

1. Participate more in educating others about pharmacist provider status.
I feel strongly that pharmacists are in a unique position to make some much-needed changes to be able to bill for services that we provide for free.
 
It is hard to justify placing a pharmacist in the emergency room for medication reconciliation when it is not billable. Because the cost savings are indirect, they are not as strong of an argument in budgeting.
 
I have seen other clinicians advocate for pharmacists in these roles and I am hopeful that 2016 is the year to bring about these changes. In 2015, the Pharmacy and Medically Underserved Areas Enhancement Act was reintroduced in the House of Representatives and Senate, and it is gaining traction. I encourage all pharmacists to join in supporting these important bills.

2. Encourage more pharmacists to become board certified.
I have received e-mails and feedback from pharmacists all over the country about board certification this past year. It is important to keep abreast of current guidelines and be able to have a working knowledge of health issues today.
 
Although most information is retrievable online, a working relationship with other clinicians and patients can really go far in educating others about medications and guideline changes in relation to pharmacy.

3. Build better relationships with nurses in the hospital.
Nurses are under a lot of pressure as the front-line providers with patients. I have a lot of respect for what they do and will continue to work to improve what I can in drug information and help taking care of patients.

4. Network with state or local pharmacy organizations.
I joined my state’s pharmacist association this year, but I found that my work schedule limited my face-to-face interactions. I did participate in the education committee, however, which was a start.

I definitely have more goals to add for this coming year, and I will start working on them and encourage you to do the same. I do believe we are in the midst of a change for pharmacists, regardless of where we work.
 
It is important for us all to get involved and work together to make 2016 our best year yet!

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